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Hormonic Balancer-Going on really hard

Posted By Jack Groat 2 Weeks Ago
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Jack Groat
Question Posted 2 Weeks Ago
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Well, my brand new harmonic balancer is stuck halfway on.  Gotta pull it off with a removal tool.  My "how to" book says to polish the crank nose with emery cloth.  We did that but not seriously.  Only thing I know to do now is to get really serious with some elbow grease and several sheets of emery cloth.

Could heat the center a little with a torch, but those balancers have a rubber ring between the inside hub and the outer ring which I am sure doesn't like a lot of heat..  

Seems I never quit asking questions...  I really have a lot of experience building motors but this engine has really been a handful..  

Thanks guys..
Tedster
Posted 2 Weeks Ago
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Just curious, is the new balancer a Powerbond or? The one I bought was tight, as they need to be, though not excessively so. There aren't too many options for a new manufacture Y-Block balancer. I've seen some on eBay that are hecho in Mexico, but they don't have any timing marks. Not a show stopper I guess.

The damper in a 200° oven ought not to hurt the elastomeric? Make sure SWMBO is visiting relatives or something. Then order some steaks from Kansas City. (Stay with me here.) They ship the steaks in those styrofoam containers with dry ice, to keep them frozen in shipping. Apply the dry ice to the crank snout.

The manuals used to specify "white lead" on the crank snout to aid installation. Get the damper installed, and enjoy the steaks. I'm sure she'll understand about the steaks when you explain your reasoning. A good steak should still be mooing when done just right.
Cliff
Posted 2 Weeks Ago
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You need to measure the crank snout then measure in ID of the Damper, I find once in a wile the damper will need a little honing, this can be done with a brake hone, heating is not the way to do it.
55blacktie
Posted 2 Weeks Ago
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I find that it helps to have the right tools. I just bought a damper puller from CASCO. It arrived within 3 days and works well. They also sell a damper installer. Tools aren't cheap, but not having the right tools can be costly.
paul2748
Posted 2 Weeks Ago
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Beside a brake hone on the damper, look closely at the snout of the crank to see if there are any spots that cold be causing the problem.  Specifically inspect the key way in the crank and pulley for any dirt or other material that can cause the problem.  Also check the key closely for any thing amiss.


54 Victoria 312;  48 Ford Conv 302, 56 Bird 312
Forever Ford
Midland Park, NJ

Ted
Posted 3 Weeks Ago
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You don’t mention what brand damper or the application.  High pressure lubricant or anti-seize is always recommended when installing the damper and that’s assuming the amount of interference fit is correct.  This should not be said but I’ll mention it anyway, “Always use a damper installing tool and not a mallet to install the damper”.
 
I do deal with a large number of ATI dampers that require honing before they will press fit on the crankshaft snouts and those do require some honing to get the correct fit on the snout.  When it comes to honing the damper holes, a special hone is required to resize a hole with a keyway slot.  Trying to enlarge a hole with a keyway slot using the incorrect hone will egg shape the hole.

Lorena, Texas (South of Waco)


Jack Groat
Posted 3 Weeks Ago
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I bought the damper from Summit Racing and the box had no labels.  It did have timing marks. 

I would like to report success.  With a lot of emery cloth, some anti seize lubricant and a mallet (I hadn't read Ted's comments) it is now in place.  I used a large round piece of wood so I didn't hit directly on the damper.  Also, as soon as I could get the bolt started I used the bolt to take it the final distance.
Joe-JDC
Posted 3 Weeks Ago
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Beating on the damper affects the thrust bearing surface, regardless of the material used.  It shocks all the bearings in the rods, crankshaft, and can create stress cracks.  Don't do it.  Joe-JDC

JDC
DryLakesRacer
Posted 3 Weeks Ago
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It’s why I buy longer cap screws and flat washers to install dampers. Generously lube the threads. The first engines I ever over hauled had no threads. I was taught to install the damper with the pan off and use wedges to protect the thrust bearing.

56 Vic, B'Ville 200 MPH Club Member, So Cal.
DANIEL TINDER
Posted 2 Weeks Ago
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I bought a NOS dampener to install on my spare motor, and when I realized it wouldn’t go on without honing, I took it to a local machine shop that had the proper tool.  I THOUGHT my measuring tools were accurate, and gave the shop specific specs.  When I finally installed it, I found it went on just a bit too easy (I had the correct installation tool).  Lesson learned; Better to underestimate how much material to remove, since you can always take it back again if it’s still too tight.
P.S. Wondering the consequences of not enough installation interference, even if the dampener is well bolted down? (Ted?)

6 VOLTS/POS. GRD. NW INDIANA


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