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Should I use any additives such as ZDDP on a newly rebuilt Y-block?

Posted By Danny Last Year
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Should I use any additives such as ZDDP on a newly rebuilt Y-block?

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Danny
Posted Last Year
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My 312 yblock is in the process of being rebuilt. Should I use any additives during engine break in? Should I continue using additives after break in?
Ted
Posted 6 Months Ago
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A ZDDP additive is good insurance against premature cam lobe/tappet wear in a freshly rebuilt engine and especially where the content of the zinc/phosphorus in the oil being used is questionable.  The initial break in period is critical for new engines and that’s when a majority of wear from friction takes place.  Keep in mind that additives are not a cure all for selecting an inappropriate oil for your engine though.  Likewise, if there are other problems existing within the engine upon startup, an additive will not solve those.  My preference for ZDDP additives are those in the 4oz or smaller bottles as those will have a minimal amount of base stock oil to carry the additive.  Assuming the engine oil being used is correct for flat tappet camshafts, then I don’t use zinc additives after the intial break in has been performed.
 
Here’s the list of items that can contribute to premature cam/lifter wear.  This was previously published in The Y-Block Magazine in 2012.  This is not a complete list.
http://www.eatonbalancing.com/2012/11/06/camshaft-and-lifter-failure-causes-2/ 


Lorena, Texas (South of Waco)
Florida_Phil
Posted 6 Months Ago
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I use Comp Cams Engine Break In Oil Additive in my new engine.  I added it to the oil on first start up and add a bottle on every oil change.  So far, so good.
http://forums.y-blocksforever.com/uploads/images/199f399a-dd27-4a99-af28-8a65.jpg


2721955meteor
Posted 6 Months Ago
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i have a different opinion re initial start up, 1 cam should have molley based greas supplied by most new cam suppliers on all lobes of the cam and lifters. 90% of engine oils have plenty of additives to acomedte startup(excluding rotela t or any oils for modern sulphur free diesel engines.bo not use)  2 pre lube before startup being sure rockers are getting oil.( i prefer blocking return tubes to adeptly  lube rockers  and valve guedes. then mix lube oil and gas for a shot down the carb for first start. this ensures valve train lube and piston rings esetial lub, as well making life easier for starters. valve lash also critical, no tight ones. run it for 15to 20 min . then reset vaves. start  using the vehicle. if you do not intend to use after this, start over when you are road ready. i will say i do only 2 or3 ys per year, but have yet to loose a cam on a y block   idid send some members of the test by a ca engineer re lube oil tests,most if not all have adequate oil for older engines with flat tappet cams. leave the oil alone  the blenders know there business. good luck
Rusty_S85
Posted 6 Months Ago
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for break in it wouldn't hurt to use a bottle of ZDDP additive along with a good conventional oil with ZDDP already in it.  After break in you don't have to run ZDDP if you have a good quality oil with ZDDP.  I run VR1 conventional in my old 292 as it has high zinc levels formulated for flat tappet engines.  its also not a cheap oil either but its better than stocking zddp additives for when you top off your engine.

1956 Ford Fairlane Town Sedan - 292 Y8 - Ford-O-Matic - 155,000 mi

PF Arcand
Posted 6 Months Ago
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Florida Phil; can you explain why are you are using a" break-in" additive, long after it's broke in?


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Florida_Phil
Posted 6 Months Ago
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I have a friend that is a professional bracket racer.   He builds a lot of engines for local racers.  He recommends adding a bottle of this additive with every oil change.  His engines see a lot more abuse than mine does.  Taking the engine out of a 55 Thunderbird with O/D is not something I want to repeat.  I think it's good insurance against blowing out a cam.  Maybe I'm throwing away money, maybe not.

At assembly, I used Isky paste moly cam lube on the lobes and lifters and Red Line assembly lube on the bearings.  I cut the cam grove to .030 and primed the pump by hand with a speed wrench. My engine has a blueprinted oil pump from Precision Oil Pumps.  It's a great pump at a great price. http://stores.precisionoilpumps.com/blueprinted-melling-ford-292-312-oil-pump/

I run Valvoline 10w30 Racing oil in my engine.  So far, everything has held up without issue.

charliemccraney
Posted 6 Months Ago
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Racing can have different requirements than street.
You can also have too much zinc and phosphorous and if you are using racing oil along with the break in additive, this is certainly happening.  Too much will degrade the cam just as too little may.  You don't need to double up.  #1 is to find out from your favorite oil brand what they recommend.  If no additive is required, don't add anything.  If an additive is recommended, add only enough to bring it up to recommended levels.


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Barry
Posted 6 Months Ago
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Hi Phil,
This is non of my business but there are two types of racing oil.
The real racing oils say do not leave in and drain after racing .
The fake ones will say you can leave in.(certain amount of time)
Real ones normally will have a reduced or none of the detergent package and no moisture dispersant's, so they can get more friction modifiers in the oil as that is all a truce race needs.
Risk would be like the old days (60's and 70's) of Quaker-state where you tear down engine and scope out a full grocery bag of sludge.
Personally in my older engines I run 15w50 Mobil-! and a bottle of zddp

Phil it would be worth checking out as my statement goes back a number of years and things do change, so could be wrong.
KULTULZ
Posted 6 Months Ago
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The real racing oils say do not leave in and drain after racing .
The fake ones will say you can leave in.(certain amount of time)
Real ones normally will have a reduced or none of the detergent package and no moisture dispersant's, so they can get more friction modifiers in the oil as that is all a truce race needs.


THANX!

This is one of the discussions I shy away from as there are so many varied opinions and usually turns into a food fight.

RACING OIL is just that. It is drained frequently for tear-downs and such. It has very limited detergent/dispersant packages. The other "RACING OILS" may have a better package meant for a flat tappet street engine.


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