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Canton small block Ford windage tray in Y Block

Posted By slumlord444 11 days ago
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slumlord444
Posted 11 days ago
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The new Y Block Magazine came today and an article on a 303 Y Block by Ted featured a Canton small block Ford windage tray adapted to  the Y Block. The artice stated it was easily adaptable to the Y Block. I would like to see details on this. I have a Ford factory windage tray on a small block Ford and didn't see any easy way to adapt that to my Y Block. The Ford bolts to the main bearing bolts using special main bolts with studs manufactured on the heads of the bolts. The Canton looks like it belongs there and I want one on my Y Block.
Ted
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To adapt the Canton SBF windage tray to the Y, I used four main cap bolts originally from the rear sump 351W or Ford M engines that had studs on them for the oil pickup tube.  If you don’t have them sitting loose then those particular bolts are available either from Ford or Canton.  With those bolts installed with spacers sandwiched between the bolt heads and the #2 and #4 Y-Block main caps, the holes on one side of the windage tray are slightly elongated to allow the tray to fit cleanly over the main cap studs.  Here are some pics.
http://forums.y-blocksforever.com/uploads/images/aca5dffc-6575-40c9-b284-4516.jpg 

http://forums.y-blocksforever.com/uploads/images/65fbd0c7-b307-4056-a2d6-aa06.jpg 

http://forums.y-blocksforever.com/uploads/images/77cb43ff-c3d1-4a01-947c-3472.jpg 

http://forums.y-blocksforever.com/uploads/images/c6ea0111-8762-4fd7-8613-b3be.jpg 



Lorena, Texas (South of Waco)


charliemccraney
Posted 10 days ago
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I used Mopar main studs with windage tray standoffs incorporated.  They are just barely short enough to work in later blocks.  Earlier block may need the holes tapped deeper but if you're fitting a windage tray, that has likely been done.


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Joe-JDC
Posted 10 days ago
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Canton offers the four studs for the 289-302, and 351W-C mains.  The 292 crankshafts were used as stroker cranks for the 289-302 SBFs before aftermarket stroker cranks became available.  The bore spacing is same as SBF, and the mains spacing makes it nearly a bolt in for the Canton windage tray/screen.  There is a front sump and rear sump screen for the 289 and 351W.  Joe-JDC

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slumlord444
Posted 10 days ago
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Thanks for the clarification. I will be ordering the parts. Sure wish I had known this several years back when I was putting my engine together. Getting the oil pan off on my T Bird with the engine in the car will not be fun. I have had the block drilled and tapped for the longer ARP bolts. Any issures with replacing the ARP bolts with the Ford bolts? What did you use for the spacers?
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slumlord444 (11/26/2019)
... What did you use for the spacers?

The material for the spacers is 7/8” diameter cold roll with a lathe drilled 33/64” hole down its middle.  There’s nothing set in stone on the material or numbers as options could include using 1” cold roll while the drilled hole itself could also be slightly larger at 17/32”.  The spacers are cut to length in the lathe with the exact thickness of each spacer being maintained by spot facing each end to insure that they fit square on the main caps.  The length of the spacer was determined by the difference in ‘under head’ length between the original Ford Y main bolts and the replacement studded bolts.  The holes in the spacers were chamfered to prevent any burrs at the drilled hole edges.


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slumlord444
Posted 7 days ago
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I'm assuming that you can't just shorten the bolts to the same length as the Y Block bolts is that the windage tray wouldn't clear the crank? Would a mild steel spacer or a stack of hardened steel washers also be satisfactory? I don't have a lathe or a friend with one.
Joe-JDC
Posted 7 days ago
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I bought the Canton 20-942 351W stud bolt kit, and if you use two washers under the main cap nut, then it can be torqued down properly, and leaves quite a bit of room for you to move the tray up or down.  You will need 4 extra 1/2" grade 8 washers, and 4 extra 1/2"-20 nuts if you don't have access to Ted's type of spacer and bolts he used.  The Canton studs cost more than the windage tray.  You will have to trim the screen some, and elongate or oversize the four holes.   Joe-JDC

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slumlord444 (11/29/2019)
I'm assuming that you can't just shorten the bolts to the same length as the Y Block bolts is that the windage tray wouldn't clear the crank? Would a mild steel spacer or a stack of hardened steel washers also be satisfactory? I don't have a lathe or a friend with one.

Joe’s suggestion of using a stud kit is a good alternative to what I did.  It also makes adjustment of the windage tray height for the proper clearance to the swinging connecting rods much more flexible.
 
Shortening the 351W bolts will not get you where you need to be.  First the thread length just gets too short but more importantly, the windage tray will sit too low and create clearance issues with the rotating assembly.  Shortening the bolts will also force more modifications to the windage tray itself as it will now be sitting lower in the block and doesn’t fit as well as a result.
 
The spacers do two things.  First they allow the underhead lengths of the 351W main bolts to be the same installed length as the original Ford Y-Block main bolts.  That’s important as it allows for the proper thread penetration into the block.  Look at that first picture in my post above as it shows the 351W bolt with spacer laid next to the original main bolt.  Second the spacers raise the bolt mounting surface for the windage tray so that the windage tray is sitting high enough to clear the connecting rods as they swing past the windage tray.  Keep in mind that the EMC engine is using a stock 3.3” stroke crankshaft and using a 312 or stroker crankshaft will decrease any clearance to the windage tray so the installed height is important.  Also lowering the windage tray will force more modifications to the tray itself to get it to fit within the confines of the block.
 
You asked about using washers.  Stacking washers under the main bolt head to get the same height effect as a single spacer is not recommended.  Maintaining the correct torque on the main bolts with a stack or washers will be difficult to achieve as there’s too much going on when those washers are all heat cycling individually.  If it was just two washers, I’d say go for it but in this case you are looking at using potentially at least 5-6 washers depending upon their thickness.  And then the diameter of the washers is another issue.  You don’t want the washers any thicker than the caps themselves which means the maximum diameter for those would be 0.975”.  I used 7/8” cold roll so there was no need to machine the O.D. of the material any smaller to fit within the thickness of the main caps.  If the washers exceed the thickness of the main cap, then they are potentially in an area that will hit a crankshaft counterweight.  Looking through the MSC, McMaster-Carr, or Granger catalogs may find some extra thick ½” hole washers being already available.


Lorena, Texas (South of Waco)


Ted
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Here are a couple of more pictures showing the clearance both with the connecting rods and the crankshaft counterweight.
http://forums.y-blocksforever.com/uploads/images/22236aca-455b-44f7-8214-7d12.jpg 

http://forums.y-blocksforever.com/uploads/images/88605316-d26c-4db9-b5a8-cfdd.jpg 


Lorena, Texas (South of Waco)




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