Profile Picture

bearing or bushing

Posted By emtdude56 2 Weeks Ago
You don't have permission to rate!
Author
Message
emtdude56
Question Posted 2 Weeks Ago
View Quick Profile
Turbocharged

Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 4 days ago
Posts: 19, Visits: 71
does any body recall if a 56f100 292 takes a pilot bearing or bushing in the end of the crank
also maybe a part number  its been a long time since I had one apart thanks
charliemccraney
Posted Last Week
View Quick Profile
Supercharged

Supercharged (8.4K reputation)Supercharged (8.4K reputation)Supercharged (8.4K reputation)Supercharged (8.4K reputation)Supercharged (8.4K reputation)Supercharged (8.4K reputation)Supercharged (8.4K reputation)Supercharged (8.4K reputation)Supercharged (8.4K reputation)

Group: Moderators
Last Active: 52 minutes ago
Posts: 5.5K, Visits: 78.0K
It would have been a bronze bushing originally.  A bearing can work.  I wouldn't recommend it as there is no benefit but if you must, use a  sealed, maintenance free bearing.  Reason being that you can't lubricate it regularly, as bearings require and if it seizes, it may damage the input shaft.  Been there, done that on another brand engine.



Lawrenceville, GA
Gene Purser
Posted Last Week
View Quick Profile
Supercharged

Supercharged (352 reputation)Supercharged (352 reputation)Supercharged (352 reputation)Supercharged (352 reputation)Supercharged (352 reputation)Supercharged (352 reputation)Supercharged (352 reputation)Supercharged (352 reputation)Supercharged (352 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 7 hours ago
Posts: 153, Visits: 3.1K
Since the inner diameter of the bearing doesn't turn on the input shaft it is prone to seize to the shaft, making removal of the transmission difficult. For this reason I prefer the bushing. Besides, there is no horsepower to gain from a bearing. 
emtdude56
Posted Last Week
View Quick Profile
Turbocharged

Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)Turbocharged (55 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 4 days ago
Posts: 19, Visits: 71
thanks very much big help
darrell
Posted Last Week
View Quick Profile
Supercharged

Supercharged (326 reputation)Supercharged (326 reputation)Supercharged (326 reputation)Supercharged (326 reputation)Supercharged (326 reputation)Supercharged (326 reputation)Supercharged (326 reputation)Supercharged (326 reputation)Supercharged (326 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 43 minutes ago
Posts: 155, Visits: 4.9K
all the heavy trucks with the steel crank use a bearing.all ive seen at any rate.
Ted
Posted 2 Weeks Ago
View Quick Profile
Co-Administrator

Co-Administrator (8.9K reputation)Co-Administrator (8.9K reputation)Co-Administrator (8.9K reputation)Co-Administrator (8.9K reputation)Co-Administrator (8.9K reputation)Co-Administrator (8.9K reputation)Co-Administrator (8.9K reputation)Co-Administrator (8.9K reputation)Co-Administrator (8.9K reputation)

Group: Administrators
Last Active: 13 hours ago
Posts: 5.8K, Visits: 85.3K
My preference is the bronze bushing.  I had a pilot bearing in my 427 Ford wtth a Top Loader and that bearing seized to the input shaft which made the transmission a bear to remove as the car had a scattershield.  The V10 in my truck came factory supplied with the pilot bearing and those were failing at 20K mile intervals.  The grease was essentially being cooked out of them.  I machined a bronze bushing to go in that spot and its now been over 80K miles without issue.


Lorena, Texas (South of Waco)


Reading This Topic


Site Meter