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Bridgeport Mill

Posted By hjh 5 Years Ago
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hjh
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Can anyone make any sugestions on moving my Bridgeport Mill with a fork lift , other then getting under the base and ending with a ton of scrap when it tips over? [Topheavy] Thanks
Harry Hutten
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Unclear how far you're trying to go with it, Harry.  Also unclear what species of Bridgeport you have. 

IF you have a tool room size vertical spindle knee and column type machine, I moved one at an earlier time from one room to another using a number of metal pipe lengths under the base to advance the beast slowly to its new location.  I think we used 1 1/2 inch pipe that was available on site.

To begin the lifting, I vaguely recall using two automotive floor jacks on either side of the mill knee.  More than one two-by-four on edge was used to bridge the distance between the two floor jacks going under the knee.  I think that we positioned the wood between the knee lift screw and the dovetail for the knee to effect the lifting.  The notion was to tip the mill in the direction of the column enough to get a length of pipe under the front edge of the base. 

Once we were able to put a length of pipe parallel with the mill table under the front edge of the base, the machine was manually pushed from the back to get it up on a second piece of pipe up front.  The routine was to slowly roll it forward adding lengths of pipe in the front and removing them from the rear as we rolled forward.  I think three of us were able to accomplish this.  The more the better, though. 

-Ahhh... to be young again.  Rolleyes  Be careful! 

Best Wishes,


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a.k.a. Charlie Brown
near Syracuse, New York
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Second thought, since you've got the tow motor we didn't have...

Consider using the same jacking technique and even some larger diameter lengths of pipe to get the mill up onto a rugged, perhaps custom built, pallet that the tow motor forks can slip through.

Again, Best Wishes!


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a.k.a. Charlie Brown
near Syracuse, New York
59 custom
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I have a Lagun knee mill that I have moved several times with a forklift.  Take an 8' 4x4 and cut it into two 4' lengths.  Now take the two 4' pieces and set them down together on top of the forklift forks.  Drive the forklift so it is facing the front of your knee mill.  Raise the forks with the 4x4's so they go above the table and under the spindle head.  The 4x4's will be parallel with the table. Raise the forks until the wood contacts the knee mill several inches behind the spindle head. Make sure the table is centered.  This method will only work if the ground is fairly smooth.  I hope this was clear enough to understand.

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Question, '59 Custom...

IF yours is a vertical spindle mill, have you had the overarm extending somewhat for the tow motor forks to lift on?


Sure sounds easier than my thought of getting the mill up onto a pallet!

____________________________

Also, thanks again for the help on finding the thread on dynamic compression ratio and its relationship to octane requirement.

Regards,


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a.k.a. Charlie Brown
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Yes, mine is a vertical spindle mill.  If you want to see what mine looks like, just google a picture of a Lagun FTV-2 mill. On mine, I move the wood as far back as it will go from the spindle head up against the vertical column.  At least on my mill, it is pretty well balanced at that point.  Just lift it slow and see how it looks.  Hope it works out for you.

Do not know about Bridgeports, my mill also has a lifting eyebolt on top.  I have used that a couple of times just to pick the mill straight up. Unfortunately, the balance point is not as good causing the mill to hang at an angle, but would work for putting a mill on a pallet.  Let me know if it all works out for you.

You are more than welcome for the archived page on dynamic compression vs octane.  Over the years, I have saved many pages that I want to keep as a reference.  That just happened to be one of them.

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glrbird
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Harry
 Does it have a eye bolt or a threaded hole on the arm at the top of the mill arm that holds the head? You can lift it there with an engine hoist and then put the forks under the base. That is the way I moved mine. I also rotated the head parallel to the ground and moved the head all the way toward the back of the mill before i moved it.

Gary Ryan San Antonio.TX.



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